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Ailill Anglonnach Aulomm and Maedhb ingen Echdach

HUSBAND:
Ailill Anglonnach Aulomm. (Ailill Lactighe).
Born about 160BC in Ireland; son of Ivar Mór Ottangus mac Deadha and Sinusa. (S1).

It is possible that Ailill and his father, Iar, have been reversed in the listing; making Ailill the father and Iar his son.; as he is said to be the son of Eochaidh Feidhleach, King of Ireland, who died about 131 BC in Tara, Ireland (S1). This death date though seems to be quite late.

WIFE:
Maedhb ingen Echdach. (Medb)(Maeve).
Daughter of Eochaidh Feidlioch mac Fionn, Rí na h'Éireann and Cloth Fionn ingen Echdach. (S2).

Maeve is responsible for the Cattle Raid of Cooley. (S1).

Táin Bó Cúailnge, "the driving-off of cows of Cooley", commonly known as The Cattle Raid of Cooley or The Táin) is a legendary tale from early Irish literature, often considered an epic, although it is written primarily in prose rather than verse. It tells of a war against Ulster by the Connacht queen Medb and her husband Ailill, who intend to steal the stud bull Donn Cuailnge, opposed only by the teenage Ulster hero Cú Chulainn. (S4).

Traditionally set in the 1st century AD in an essentially pre-Christian heroic age, the Táin is the central text of a group of tales known as the Ulster Cycle. It survives in three written versions or "recensions" in manuscripts of the 12th and later centuries, the first a compilation largely written in Old Irish, the second a more consistent work in Middle Irish, and the third an Early Modern Irish version.. (S4).

Medb (Old Irish spelling, [m?ðv]; Middle Irish: Me??, Mea??; early modern Irish: Meadhbh, [m??v]; Modern Irish: Méabh [m?e?v], Medbh or Maebh; sometimes Anglicised Maeve, Maev or Maive /'me?v/) is queen of Connacht in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. Her husband in the core stories of the cycle is Ailill mac Máta, although she had several husbands before him who were also kings of Connacht. She rules from Cruachan (now Rathcroghan, County Roscommon). She is the enemy (and former wife) of Conchobar mac Nessa, king of Ulster, and is best known for starting the Táin Bó Cúailnge ("The Cattle Raid of Cooley") to steal Ulster's prize stud bull. (S3).

How Medb came to power in Connacht and married Ailill is told in the tale Cath Bóinde ("The Battle of the Boyne"), also known as Ferchuitred Medba ("Medb's man-share"). Her father, Eochaid Feidlech, the High King of Ireland, married her to Conchobar mac Nessa, king of Ulster, because he had killed Conchobar's purported father, the former High King Fachtna Fáthach, in battle. She bore him a son, Glaisne, but the marriage was a bad one and she left him. Eochaid gave Conchobar another of his daughters, Eithne (or Clothru), but Medb murdered her while she was pregnant; her son Furbaide was born by posthumous caesarian section. (S3).

Eochaid deposed the then-king of Connacht, Tinni mac Conri, and installed Medb in his place. However, Tinni regained a share of the throne when he and Medb later became lovers. Conchobar raped Medb after an assembly at Tara, and war ensued between the High King and Ulster. Tinni challenged Conchobar to single combat, and lost. Eochaid Dála of the Fir Domnann, who had been Tinni's rival for the kingship, protected the Connacht army as it retreated, and became Medb's next husband and king of Connacht. Medb demanded her husband satisfy her three criteria—that he be without fear, meanness, or jealousy. The last was particularly important, as she had many lovers. While married to Eochaid Dála, she took Ailill mac Máta, chief of her bodyguard, as her lover. Eochaid discovered the affair, challenged Ailill to single combat, and lost. Ailill then married Medb and became king of Connacht. (S3).

Medb's children (S3).

Medb and Ailill had seven sons, all called Maine. They originally all had other names, but when Medb asked a druid which of her sons would kill Conchobar, he replied, "Maine". She did not have a son called Maine, so she renamed all her sons as follows:
Fedlimid became Maine Athramail ("like his father")
Cairbre became Maine Máthramail ("like his mother")
Eochaid became Maine Andoe ("the swift")
Fergus became Maine Taí ("the silent")
Cet became Maine Mórgor ("of great duty")
Sin became Maine Mílscothach ("honey-speech")
Dáire became Maine Móepirt ("beyond description") (S3).

The prophecy was fulfilled when Maine Andoe went on to kill Conchobar, son of Arthur, son of Bruide — not Conchobar, son of Fachtna Fathach, as Medb had assumed the druid meant.[1] Medb and Ailill also had a daughter, Findabair. (S3).

Medb insisted that she be equal in wealth with her husband, and started the Cattle Raid of Cooley when she discovered that Ailill was one powerful stud bull richer than her. She discovered that the only rival to Ailill's bull, Finnbennach, was Donn Cúailnge, owned by Dáire mac Fiachna, a vassal of Conchobar's. She sent messengers to Dáire, offering wealth, land and sexual favours in return for the loan of the bull, and Dáire initially agreed. But when a drunken messenger declared that, if he had not agreed, the bull would have been taken by force, Dáire withdrew his consent, and Medb prepared for war. (S3).

An army was raised including contingents from all over Ireland. One was a group of Ulster exiles led by Conchobar's estranged son Cormac Cond Longas and his foster-father Fergus mac Róich, former king of Ulster and one of Medb's lovers. It is reported that it took seven men to satisfy her, or Fergus once. Medb's relationship with Fergus is alluded to in the early poem Conailla Medb míchuru ("Medb has entered evil contracts") by Luccreth moccu Chiara (c. 600); it asserts that Medb wrongly seduced Fergus into turning against Ulster "because he preferred the buttocks of a woman to his own people". (S3).

Because of a divine curse on the Ulstermen, the invasion was opposed only by the teenage Ulster hero Cúchulainn, who held up the army's advance by demanding single combat at fords. Medb and Ailill offered their daughter Findabair in marriage to a series of heroes as payment for fighting Cúchulainn, but all were defeated. Nevertheless, Medb secured the bull. However, after a final battle against Conchobar's assembled army, she was forced to retreat. Donn Cúailnge was brought back to Cruachan, where it fought Ailill's bull, Finnbennach, killing him, but dying of his wounds. (S3).

Also, throughout the Táin Bó Cúailnge Medb has several encounters with Cúchulainn in which he kills either her pets or handmaidens and the place in which they were killed is then named after them, which illustrates the importance of landscape throughout the text of the Táin Bó Cúailnge. Examples of this occur when Cúchulainn "slung a stone and killed a pet stoat as it sat on Medb's shoulder by her neck, south of the ford. Hence the name Meithe Togmaill, Stoat Neck" and when he kills Medb’s handmaid: “He slung a stone at her from the heights of Cuincu and killed her on the flat place that bears her name, Reid Locha, Locha’s Level, in Cualinge” Medb’s behaviour further illustrates the importance of the landscape when she goes to great lengths to permanently alter it to show her contempt for Ulster. “”She preferred to cross the mountain by leaving a track that would show forever her contempt for Ulster… to make the Pass of the Cualinge Cattle.” (S3).

Out of jealousy for his affair with Medb, Ailill had Fergus killed.[8] In his old age, after Conchobar's death, the Ulster hero Conall Cernach came to stay with Ailill and Medb, as they were the only household capable of supporting him. Medb tasked him to keep an eye on Ailill, who was seeing other women. Finding Ailill in flagrante, she ordered Conall to kill him, which he was happy to do in revenge for Fergus. However, the dying Ailill sent his men after him, and he was killed while trying to escape. (S3).

In her later years she often went to bathe in a pool on Inchcleraun (Inis Cloithreann), an island on Lough Ree, near Knockcroghery. Furbaide sought revenge for the death of his mother. He took a rope and measured the distance between the pool and the shore, and practised with his sling until he could hit an apple on top of a stake Medb's height from that distance. The next time he saw Medb bathing he put his practice to good use and killed her with a piece of cheese. She was succeeded to the throne of Connacht by her son Maine Athramail. (S3).

According to legend, Medb is buried in a 40-foot (12 m) high stone cairn on the summit of Knocknarea (Cnoc na Ré in Irish) in County Sligo. Supposedly, she is buried upright facing her enemies in Ulster. Her home in Rathcroghan, County Roscommon is also a potential burial site, with a long low slab named 'Misgaun Medb' being given as the most likely location. (S3).

Some historians suggest that she was probably originally a "sovereignty goddess", whom a king would ritually marry as part of his inauguration.[9] Medb Lethderg, who performs a similar function in Tara is probably identical with or the inspiration for this Medb. Her name is said to mean 'she who intoxicates', and is cognate with the English word 'mead'; it is likely that the sacred marriage ceremony between the king and the goddess would involve a shared drink. Medb's "pillow talk" argument with her consort contains suggestions of matrilineality, as does Ailill's taking his name from his mother Máta Muirisc. Recently, Irish and Irish-American poets have explored Medb as an image of woman's power, including sexuality, as in "Labhrann Medb" ("Medb Speaks") by Irish-language poet Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and "Intoxication" by Irish-American poet Patricia Monaghan. (S3).

The name "Connacht" is an apparent anachronism: the stories of the Ulster Cycle are traditionally set around the time of Christ, but the Connachta, after whom the province is named, were said to have been the descendants of Conn Cétchathach, who is supposed to have lived several centuries later. Later stories use the name Cóiced Ol nEchmacht as an earlier name for the province of Connacht to get around this problem. However, the chronology of early Irish historical tradition is an artificial attempt by Christian monks to synchronise native traditions with classical and biblical history, and it is possible that the cycle has been chronologically misplaced. (S3).

CHILDREN of Ailill Anglonnach Aulomm:
  1. Eogan Eoghan Ottaongus MacAilell. md Muncha ingen Dil o Crecraighe.


SOURCES:


HOW ARE WE RELATED:
Ailill Anglonnach Aulomm
Eogan Ottaongus mac Ailell
Eterscel Mor mac Eoghan
Conaire I Mor mac Etersceoil
Cairpre Finn Mor mac Conaire ui Eremoin
Daire Dorn Mor mac Cairpre
Coirpre Cromcheann mac Daire
Luctacus mac Caibre
Mogh Lamha mac Lugdach and Eithne
Conaire Caem mac Modh Lamha
Eochaid Cairbre Riata mac Conaire
Fiachra Cathmail mac Echach
Eochaid Antoit mac Fiachrach
Achir Cirre mac Echach, King of Dalriada Ireland.   (c231AD-294AD).
Finn Fiacc mac Achir, King of Dalriada Ireland.  (249AD-303AD).  
Cruitluithe mac Finn.  (c270AD-317AD).  King of Dalriada Ireland. 
Senchormac Fincormach mac Cruithluithe, King of Dalriada Ireland. (c280AD-338AD). 
Fedelmid Ruamach mac Senchormac, King of Dalriada Ireland.  (c304AD-?).  
Aengus Buiding mac Feideilmid. King of Dalriada Ireland.  
Fedelmid Aislingich Fedlimid Aisling.  King of Dalriada, Ireland 
Aengus Fert mac Feideilmid..  King of Dalriada, Ireland 
Eochaid Muinremuir mac Oengus, King of Dalriada Ireland.  (c380AD-439AD).  
ERC mac Echach. (c400AD-474AD). Had 12 sons, six stayed in Ireland, six moved to Scotland. 
FERGUS Mor Mac Erca Came to Scotland about 420 AD. (?-487AD).     [see CHART A30]  
DOMANGART I (Dongard) (?-457AD)
GABHRAN (Conran) (d. 535 AD)
AIDAN of Argyll (Edhan) (?-608AD)
EOCHAIDH I Buidhe (Eugene IV) (d.622AD)
DOMNALL BREC (Donald IV)  (?-c642AD)
DOMANGART II MacDomnall (?-673AD)  
EOICHAID of Argyl (?-698AD) md. Entfidich
EOICHAID III (?-733AD)  
Aed Find (Etfinus, Ethafind) (d. 761 AD) m. Fergina
EOCHAID Achaias (d. 819 AD) m. Fergusia
ALPIN MacEochaid (d. 834 AD)
Kenneth II MacAlpin (c810-854AD)
Constantin I, King of Scotland (d. 874 AD)
DONALD II, King of Scotland (d. 903 AD)
MALCOLM I, King of Scotland (?-954AD)
KENNETH II, King of Scotland (?-995AD)
MALCOLM II, King of Scotland (c954-1034AD)
Bethoc (Beatrix) md. Crinan of Dunkeld.
Duncan I, The Gracious (c1001-1040) md. Aelflaed (Sybil) of Northumbria 
MALCOLM III Caenmore (d. A.D.1055-1093) md. Margret of England
DAIVD I, The Saint (c1080-1153) md. Maud of Northcumberland
HENRY of Huntingdon (d. A.D.1152 ) md. Adama of Surrey
  |
David of Huntingdon (?-1219 ) md. Maud of Chester
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Isabella of Huntingdon md. Robert IV de Brus ((?-c1233)
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Robert V de Brus (c1215–1295) md. Isabella de Clare, of Gloucester
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Robert VI de Brus md. Marjorie of Carrick
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Robert I Bruce (1274-1329) md. Isabella of Mar
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Margary Bruce md. Walter Stewart III
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Robert II (d. A.D. 1390) md. Euphemia of Ross (d. A.D. 1376)
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Robert III (Stuart) (d. A.D. 1406) md. Arabella Drummond (d. A.D. 1401)
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James I, King of Scotland (1394-1437).   md. Joan Beaufort
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Joan STEWART (STUART) (1428-1493).  md. James DOUGLAS III, Earl of Morton 
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Janet DOUGLAS (c1461-1489).  md. Patrick HEPBURN 
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Jane HEPBURN (1485-c1558).   md. George SEATON 
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George SEATON III (c1508-1549).  md. Elizabeth HAY 
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Marion SEATON (1528-1567).  md. John GRAHAM 
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Margaret (Mary) GRAHAM (1549-?).  md. George BUCHANAN      
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Margaret Helen BUCHANAN (1576-1617).  md. (Sir) Alexander COLQUHOUN 
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(Sir) Alexander COLQUHOUN (c1593-?) md. Marion Stirling (Sterling) 
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(Sir) John COLQUHOUN (1595 or1632-c1647) md. Rebecca Short  
William CAHOON (1633-1675) md. Deliverence PECK
Joseph CAHOON (1665-1710) md. (2) Elizabeth SCRANTON  
Ebenezer CAHOON (c1706-?) md. Mary REYNOLDS 
William CAHOONE (1733-1813) md. (2) Elizabeth VAUGHAN 
William CAHOON (1765-1828) md. (2) Mary SMITH 
Mary CAHOON (1810-c1838) md. David ELLIOTT  
Peter Mack ELLIOTT (1833-1885) md. Charlotte ALVORD
Harriett Louisa ELLIOTT (1860-1902) md. James Newberry MORRIS 
Eli Ray MORRIS (1892-1980) md. Tina Matilda KUNZLER 
LeGrand Elliott MORRIS. (1916-2005) md. Dorothea Bertha Ernestine KERSTEN (1922-?)
Rodney Allen MORRIS  (1949-?) md. Deborah Lee Handy