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ALAIN I Duc de Dol, le Grand

HUSBAND:
ALAIN I. Duc de Dol, le Grand (The Great). Count of Vannes and Duke of Brittany (dux Brittonium)(Roi de Bretagne).
Born about 854; son of RIDOREDH Count of Vannes.

He married Orequen de Rennes in 874 in Rennes, Îlle-et-Vilaine, France. (S1).

Alan I, called the Great, was the Count of Vannes and Duke of Brittany (dux Brittonium) from 876 until his death. He was probably also the only King of Brittany (rex Brittaniæ) to hold that title by legitimate grant of the Emperor. (S1,S3).

He succeeded his brother Pascweten in Vannes and Brittany when the latter died, probably in the middle of 876. He represented the power bloc of southeastern Brittany and had to fight, initially, against Judicael of Poher, representative of western Breton interests, for the ducal throne. Eventually he and Judicael made peace in order to fight the Vikings. Judicael died in the Battle of Questembert in 888 or 889. (S1).

After the death of Judicael, Alan ruled all of Brittany as it had been during the time of Salomon. He ruled not only the Breton territories of Léon, Domnonée, Cornouaille, and the Vannetais, but also the Frankish counties of Rennes, Nantes, Coutances, and Avranches, as well as the western parts of Poitou (the so-called pays de Retz) and Anjou. In the east his rule extended as far as the river Vire. He was the first Breton ruler to rule this entire territory without great opposition within the west and the last to rule the whole bloc of Franco-Celtic countries. His strongest opponent was Fulk I of Anjou, who disputed control of the Nantais with him, though Alan seems to have had the upper hand in his lifetime. His power base remained in the southeast and he was powerful and wealthy in land in around Vannes and Nantes. (S1).

In 890, Alan defeated the Vikings at Saint-Lô, chasing them into a river where many drowned. (S1).

According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, after the death of Carloman II in 884, Charles the Fat succeeded to all of West Francia save Brittany, thus making Brittany an independent kingdom; but this does not seem to have been true. A charter datable to between 897 and 900 makes reference to the soul of Karolus on whose behalf Alan had ordered prayers to be said in the monastery of Redon. This was probably Charles the Fat, who, as emperor, probably granted Alan the right to be titled rex. As emperor he would have had that prerogative and he is known to have had contacts with Nantes in 886, making it not improbable that he came into communication with Alan. Charles also made a concerted effort to rule effectively in the entirety of his empire and to make former enemies, with dubious ties to the empire, like the Viking Godfrid, men of standing in return for their loyalty. Throughout his reign, Alan used Carolingian symbols of regalia and Carolingian forms in his charters. (S1).

Alan augmented his power during the weak reigns of Odo and Charles III. He died in 907 and Brittany was overrun by Vikings, who held the region until 936, when Alan's grandson, Alan II, succeeded in reestablishing Christian rule, but Brittany was never thenceforth as extended as in Alan's time and no future Breton rulers were called kings. (S1).

He married Oreguen. (S1).

Alain I was King of Britain about 890 to 907. (S1).

The son of a late Ridoredh according to a genealogy based in Saint Aubin of Angers in the eleventh century. He is the successor of his brother Pascweten († 876 ), himself son and successor of King Solomon († 874 ), Alain Comte de Vannes, Count of Nantes. He inherited the quarrels with the county of Rennes for the crown of Britain.

In 890, he distinguished himself at the battle of Questembert where the Vikings were defeated. Moreover Judicaël Rennes dies there. Now unopposed, he became King of Britain. He receives the time of the Abbey of Saint-Aubin d'Angers. His reign 890 - 907 marks a period of calm and prosperity for Britain. The exact day of his death is unknown.

It was in this time between Alain and dukes of Brittany Judicaël a serious dispute over the division of the kingdom. The pagans found the Britons divided, fighting each separately and refusing each other relief, as if victory should belong to everyone not to all. They experienced serious setbacks and were slain on all sides and all their possessions removed to the river Blavet. So finally noticing how their contention had increased the strength of their enemies, they rallied each other by envoys, agreed time and place of appointment and met to make war force communes. Judicaël youngest who was most eager to illustrate his name, without waiting Alain engaged the fight with his companions, killed many thousands of enemies, the rest forced to take refuge in a township where islands having rashly pursued further than he should have, he was killed by them, not knowing that he is not to conquer but not to further victory, for despair is to be feared. Alain then gathered all of Britain, vowed that if by divine grace, he managed to defeat his enemies he would spend in Rome, St. Peter and God the tenth part of all his property. All Britons have also formed this wish, he advanced in battle, he made a great slaughter of fifteen thousand enemie, only 4000 they returned to the fleet.

After the death of Judicael, Alan ruled all of Brittany as it had been during the time of Salomon. He ruled not only the Breton territories of Léon, Domnonée, Cornouaille, and the Vannetais, but also the Frankish counties of Rennes, Nantes, Coutances, and Avranches, as well as the western parts of Poitou (the so-called pays de Retz) and Anjou. In the east his rule extended as far as the river Vire. He was the first Breton ruler to rule this entire territory without great opposition within the west and the last to rule the whole bloc of Franco-Celtic countries. His strongest opponent was Fulk I of Anjou, who disputed control of the Nantais with him, though Alan seems to have had the upper hand in his lifetime. His power base remained in the southeast and he was powerful and wealthy in land in around Vannes and Nantes. (S3).

According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, after the death of Carloman II in 884, Charles the Fat succeeded to all of West Francia save Brittany, thus making Brittany an independent kingdom; but this does not seem to have been true. A charter datable to between 897 and 900 makes reference to the soul of Karolus on whose behalf Alan had ordered prayers to be said in the monastery of Redon. This was probably Charles the Fat, who, as emperor, probably granted Alan the right to be titled rex. As emperor he would have had that prerogative and he is known to have had contacts with Nantes in 886, making it not improbable that he came into communication with Alan. Charles also made a concerted effort to rule effectively in the entirety of his empire and to make former enemies, with dubious ties to the empire, like the Viking Godfrid, men of standing in return for their loyalty. Throughout his reign, Alan used Carolingian symbols of regalia and Carolingian forms in his charters. Alan augmented his power during the weak reigns of Odo and Charles III. (S3).

He died in 907 in Nantes, Loire-Atlantique, Pays de la Loire, France. (S1).

Alan I died in 907. The succession was disputed and Count Gourmaëlon of Cornouaille seized the throne. Brittany was soon overrun by Vikings, who defeated and slew Gourmaëlon in battle in 913/914 and held the region until 936 when Alan I's grandson Alan II returned to Brittany from exile in Æthelstan's England, vanquished the Vikings, and succeeded in reestablishing Christian rule. However, Brittany's geographic territory was never as extended as in Alan I's time and no future Breton rulers were called kings until the Breton Ducal crown was merged with the French crown in the 16th century. (S3).

Reputed connection with House of Rennes

According to an 11th-century genealogy composed for the Count of Anjou, Alan I's son, Pascweten the Younger, was the father of Judicael Berengar, whose son was Conan I, Duke of Brittany, founder of the House of Rennes. (S3).

WIFE:
Oreguen de Rennes.


CHILDREN of ALAIN I Duc de Dol, le Grand and Oreguen de Rennes:
  1. Hawise de Bretagne. She married MATUEDO I Duc de Poher. Rodney Timbrook Ancestors and Relatives (S1) says Matuedo I is the son-in-law, not the son, of Alain I Duc de Dol. Many sources say she is not named (S3), others do call her Hawise (S1,S2).
  2. Derian
  3. Guerech. (Guerec)(Guereg Budic Rudalt)(Budic)(Rudalt). Count of Vannes. He fled the Viking invasion about 919.
  4. Pascwethen de Bretagne. Died about 903.
  5. (daughter). She married Tangui, Count of Vannes. She died before 913.
  6. Berenger of Sulzbach Rennes
  7. Berenguer de Bayeux
  8. Hamon de Dinan.


SOURCES:

HOW ARE WE RELATED:
 
Alain I, Duc de Dol, le Grand (854-907) md Orequen de Rennes
Hawise de Bretagne  md Matuedo I de Poher, Duc de Bretagne (885-952) 
Alain II Bretagne, (Fretaldus)(Wrybeard)(de Poher) (c905-962)  md Roscille de Anjou
Frotmundus Vetules Bretagne  (960-1008)
Flaad, Seneschal of Dol  (1005-1064)    md  Constance De Dol
Alan, Dapifer Dolensis (Dapifer of Dol) (1024-1080) 
Flaad of Dol (1048-c1106).   
Alan FitzFlaad  (c1082-c1121)  md  Aveline de Hesdin
Simon FitzAlan (1114-1164) md Eschina (Eschyna)(Loudin)(de Londonis ( Stewart)
Robert Boyd (I) (Boyt)(Boidh) (c1155-c1240) 
Robert Boyd (II). (Robert, Dictus Boyd).  The Hero of Goldberry Hill  (c1225-c1290)
Robert Boyd (III)  (1249 - c1300 or 1330).  
Robert Boyd of Kilmarnock, 1st Baron of Kilmarnock.  (c1285-1333)
Thomas Boyd of Kilmarnock, The Archer, 2nd Baron of Kilmarnock (1323-1365) 
Thomas Dominus Boyd, 3rd Baron of Kilmarnock (1360-1410) md  Alice G. Gifford
Thomas Boyd, 4th Baron of Kilmarnock  (c1385-1432) md Joanna Montgomery
Thomas Boyd, 5th Baron of Kilmarnock  (c1405-1439) md Isabell
Robert Boyd, 1st Lord Boyd of Kilmarnock (c1415-1482)  md Mariot Maxwell
Alexander Boyd, 3rd Baron of Boyd  (1452-1508)  md  Janet Colville   
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Agnes BOYD (1523-1574).  md  John Colquhoun, Lord of Luss (c1523-1574)   
Alexander Colquhoun  (1573-1636) md Margaret Helen Buchanan
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William Cahoon  (1765-1828) md  Mary Smith
Mary Cahoon (1810-?) md   David Elliott	
Peter Mack Elliott (1833-1885)  md   Charlotte Alvord
Harriett Louisa Elliott  (1860-1902) md   James Newberry Morris  
Eli Ray Morris (1892-1980) md Tina Matilda Kunzler	
LeGrand Elliott Morris (1916-2005) md Dorothea Berta Ernestine Kersten
Rodney Allen Morris and Deborah Lee Handy